When and why performance goals predict exploitation behaviors: An achievement goal complex analysis of the selection function of assessment

We adopted an achievement goal complex framework (studying achievement goals and reasons connected to goals) to determine when and why performance goals predict exploitation of others' knowledge. We hypothesized that: (i) when selective assessment is used (exams aiming to select a limited number of individuals), the link between performance goals and exploitation orientation is stronger; (ii) the reason why is that selective assessment fosters performance goals regulated by controlled reasons. Study 1 (N=166) supported these hypotheses in a real world environment, comparing students enrolled in programs using non-selective versus selective assessment (but having a majority of common courses). Then, an experimental causal-chain-like design was used. In Study 2 (N=187), presenting an intelligence test as selective (vs. [self-]evaluative) predicted controlled reasons connected to performance goals. In Study 3 (N=192), inducing performance goals using controlling (vs. autonomy-supportive) language predicted exploitation orientation, indirectly impairing information-sharing behaviors. The results contribute to the understanding of both the structural antecedents and interpersonal consequences of achievement goal complexes.


Published in:
Motivation And Emotion, 43, 2, 266-284
Year:
Apr 01 2019
Publisher:
New York, SPRINGER/PLENUM PUBLISHERS
ISSN:
0146-7239
1573-6644
Keywords:




 Record created 2019-06-18, last modified 2019-06-26


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