Infoscience

Review

Indoor Light Enhanced Photocatalytic Ultra-Thin Films on Flexible Non-Heat Resistant Substrates Reducing Bacterial Infection Risks

Photocatalytic antibacterial sol-gel coated substrates have been reported to kill bacteria under light or in the dark. These coatings showed non-uniform distribution, poor adhesion to the substrate and short effective lifetime as antibacterial surfaces. These serious limitations to the performance/stability retard the potential application of antibacterial films on a wide range of surfaces in hospital facilities and public places. Here, the preparation, testing and performance of flexible ultra-thin films prepared by direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) at different energies are reviewed. This review reports the recent advancements in the preparation of highly adhesive photocatalytic coatings prepared by up to date sputtering technology: High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS). These latter films demonstrated an accelerated antibacterial capability compared to thicker films prepared by DCMS leading to materials saving. Nanoparticulates of Ti and Cu have been shown during the last decades to possess high oxidative redox potentials leading to bacterial inactivation kinetics in the minute range. In the case of TiO2-CuOx films, the kinetics of abatement of Escherichia coli (E. coli) and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were enhanced under indoor visible light and were perceived to occur within few minutes. Oligodynamic effect was seen to be responsible for bacterial inactivation by the small amount of released material in the dark and/or under light as detected by inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The spectral absorbance (detected by Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (DRS)) was also seen to slightly shift to the visible region based on the preparation method.

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