Journal article

ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)-a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (>= 6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S similar to 1.5 MW m(-2)) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an 'X-point target divertor' concept, at the required performance parameters-reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region-while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magneticfield side-the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination-advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions-will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept (affordable, robust, compact) (Sorbom et al 2015 Fusion Eng. Des. submitted (arXiv: 1409.3540)) that makes use of high-temperature superconductor technology-a high-field (9.25 T) tokamak the size of the Joint European Torus that produces 270 MW of net electricity.


Related material