Infoscience

Journal article

Oxidation kinetics of selected taste and odor compounds during ozonation of drinking water

The applicability of ozonation to mitigate taste and odor problems in drinking water was investigated. Second-order rate constants of eleven taste and odor compounds with ozone and hydroxyl radicals were determined under laboratory conditions. Measured rate constants for the reaction with hydroxyl radicals are between 3 x 10(9) and 10(10) M(-1)s(-1) and for ozone: k(beta-cyclocitral) = 3890 +/- 140 M(-1)s(-1); k(geosmin) = 0.10 +/- 0.03 M(-1)s(-1); k(3-hexen-1-ol) = 5.4 +/- 0.5 x 10(5) M(-1)s(-1); k(beta-ionone) = 1.6 +/- 0.13 x 10(5) M(-1)s(-1); k(2-isopropyl-3-methoxypyrazine) = 50 +/- 3 M(-1)s(-1); k(2-methylisoborneol) = 0.35 +/- 0.06 M(-1)s(-1); k(2,6-nonadienal) = 8.7 +/- 0.4 x 10(5) M(-1)s(-1); k(1-penten-3-one) = 5.9 +/- 0.1 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1); k(2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT)) = 7.4 +/- 0.2 x 10(4) M(-1)s(-1); k(2,4,6-tribromoanisole) = 0.02 +/- 0.01 M(-1)s(-1); k(2,4,6-trichloroanisole) = 0.06 +/- 0.01 M(-1)s(-1). Experiments conducted in natural waters showed that the removal efficiency during ozonation can be reliably predicted with the determined second-order rate constants. Ozonation is a powerful tool capable of oxidizing most of the taste and odor compounds to more than 50% under typical drinking water treatment conditions. For ozone-resistant taste and odor compounds, the application of advanced oxidation processes may be appropriate.

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