000265209 001__ 265209
000265209 005__ 20190415234655.0
000265209 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.2307/j.ctv92vpp2.7
000265209 020__ $$a978-1-4473-3819-2
000265209 037__ $$aBOOK_CHAP
000265209 245__ $$aWho are the strangers?
000265209 260__ $$c2019$$bPolicy Press$$aBristol
000265209 269__ $$a2019
000265209 300__ $$a25-46
000265209 336__ $$aBook Chapters
000265209 520__ $$aIn the first sentence of her book,The lonely city, British writer Olivia Laing (2016, p 3) asks the reader to imagine him- or herself standing at the window at night, when dark and illuminated windows compose the urban landscape. ‘Inside’, she writes, ‘strangers swim to and fro, attending to the business of their private hours. You can see them, but you can’t reach them, and so this commonplace urban phenomenon, available in any city of the world on any night, conveys to even the most social a tremor of loneliness, its uneasy combination of separation and exposure
000265209 700__ $$aFelder, Maxime
000265209 720_1 $$aOosterlynck, Stijn
000265209 720_1 $$aVerschraegen, Gert
000265209 720_1 $$avan Kempen, Ronald
000265209 773__ $$tDivercities: Understanding super diversity in deprived and mixed neighbourhoods$$q256
000265209 8560_ $$fvincent.kaufmann@epfl.ch
000265209 909CO $$pchapter$$ooai:infoscience.epfl.ch:265209$$pbook
000265209 960__ $$apierre.devaud@epfl.ch
000265209 961__ $$apierre.devaud@epfl.ch
000265209 973__ $$aOTHER$$sPUBLISHED
000265209 980__ $$aBOOK_CHAP
000265209 981__ $$aoverwrite
000265209 999C0 $$zBlanc, Chantal$$xU10241$$pLASUR$$mvincent.kaufmann@epfl.ch$$0252043