000222796 001__ 222796
000222796 005__ 20190317000549.0
000222796 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.5075/epfl-thesis-7311
000222796 02470 $$2urn$$aurn:nbn:ch:bel-epfl-thesis7311-2
000222796 02471 $$2nebis$$a10745347
000222796 037__ $$aTHESIS
000222796 041__ $$aeng
000222796 088__ $$a7311
000222796 245__ $$aHyper-specificity of perceptual learning
000222796 269__ $$a2016
000222796 260__ $$aLausanne$$bEPFL$$c2016
000222796 336__ $$aTheses
000222796 502__ $$aProf. Kathryn Hess Bellwald (présidente) ; Prof. Michael Herzog, Prof. Fred Mast (directeurs) ; Prof. Olaf Blanke, Prof. Takeo Watanabe, Prof. Dirk Kerzel (rapporteurs)
000222796 520__ $$aPerceptual learning is the ability to improve perception through practice. Perceptual learning is usually specific for the task and the stimulus features trained with. For example, training orientation discrimination with vertically oriented stimuli does not improve performance when the same stimuli are rotated by 90°. Often, perceptual learning is assumed to occur within the early sensory areas or when mapping sensory evidence onto decisions. Motor responses, involved in all perceptual learning experiments, are thought to play no role in the learning process. Here, we show that this is not true by providing evidence that perceptual learning is specific for the type of motor response. Interestingly, this specificity can be overcome by the use of a double training protocol. In a second project, we show that, unlike in the somatosensory and auditory system, there is surprisingly no common factor in vision. Finally, we challenge classic models of perceptual learning by showing that conditions under which perceptual learning should not occur as predicted can nevertheless occur. Taken together, our results indicate that the complexity of perceptual learning mechanisms goes much beyond classic models and current theories of perceptual learning.
000222796 6531_ $$aperceptual learning
000222796 6531_ $$aspecificity
000222796 6531_ $$atransfer
000222796 6531_ $$adouble training
000222796 6531_ $$amental imagery
000222796 6531_ $$avisual illusions
000222796 6531_ $$aschizophrenia
000222796 700__ $$0245830$$aGrzeczkowski, Lukasz$$g216406
000222796 720_2 $$0243629$$aHerzog, Michael$$edir.$$g164642
000222796 720_2 $$0(EPFLAUTH)171338$$aMast, Fred$$edir.$$g171338
000222796 8564_ $$s158951830$$uhttps://infoscience.epfl.ch/record/222796/files/EPFL_TH7311.pdf$$yn/a$$zn/a
000222796 909C0 $$0252249$$pLPSY$$xU10987
000222796 909CO $$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:222796$$pthesis$$pthesis-bn2018$$pDOI$$pSV$$qDOI2$$qGLOBAL_SET
000222796 917Z8 $$x108898
000222796 917Z8 $$x108898
000222796 918__ $$aSV$$cBMI$$dEDNE
000222796 919__ $$aLPSY
000222796 920__ $$a2016-11-8$$b2016
000222796 970__ $$a7311/THESES
000222796 973__ $$aEPFL$$sPUBLISHED
000222796 980__ $$aTHESIS