000216517 001__ 216517
000216517 005__ 20181203024153.0
000216517 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2015.08.015
000216517 022__ $$a0028-3932
000216517 02470 $$2ISI$$a000366879400005
000216517 037__ $$aARTICLE
000216517 245__ $$aInferior frontal oscillations reveal visuo-motor matching for actions and speech: evidence from human intracranial recordings
000216517 260__ $$bPergamon-Elsevier Science Ltd$$c2015$$aOxford
000216517 269__ $$a2015
000216517 300__ $$a9
000216517 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000216517 520__ $$aThe neural correspondence between the systems responsible for the execution and recognition of actions has been suggested both in humans and non-human primates. Apart from being a key region of this visuo-motor observation-execution matching (OEM) system, the human inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) is also important for speech production. The functional overlap of visuo-motor OEM and speech, together with the phylogenetic history of the IFG as a motor area, has led to the idea that speech function has evolved from pre-existing motor systems and to the hypothesis that an OEM system may exist also for speech. However, visuo-motor OEM and speech OEM have never been compared directly. We used electrocorticography to analyze oscillations recorded from intracranial electrodes in human fronto-parie-to-temporal cortex during visuo-motor (executing or visually observing an action) and speech OEM tasks (verbally describing an action using the first or third person pronoun). The results show that neural activity related to visuo-motor OEM is widespread in the frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Speech OEM also elicited widespread responses partly overlapping with visuo-motor OEM sites (bilaterally), including frontal, parietal, and temporal regions. Interestingly a more focal region, the inferior frontal gyrus (bilaterally), showed both visuo-motor OEM and speech OEM properties independent of orolingual speech-unrelated movements. Building on the methodological advantages in human invasive electrocorticography, the present findings provide highly precise spatial and temporal information to support the existence of a modality-independent action representation system in the human brain that is shared between systems for performing, interpreting and describing actions. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
000216517 6531_ $$aMovement
000216517 6531_ $$aSensory
000216517 6531_ $$aIntracranial
000216517 6531_ $$aMirror neuron system
000216517 6531_ $$aImagery
000216517 700__ $$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Cognit Neurosci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland$$aHalje, Par
000216517 700__ $$uGeneva Univ Hosp HUG, Dept Neurol, Presurg Epilepsy Evaluat Unit, Geneva, Switzerland$$aSeeck, Margitta
000216517 700__ $$0240593$$g165806$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Cognit Neurosci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland$$aBlanke, Olaf
000216517 700__ $$aIonta, Silvio$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Cognit Neurosci, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
000216517 773__ $$j79$$tNeuropsychologia$$kB$$q206-214
000216517 909C0 $$xU11025$$0252325$$pLNCO
000216517 909C0 $$xU12599$$0252517$$pCNP
000216517 909CO $$pSV$$particle$$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:216517
000216517 917Z8 $$x242763
000216517 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-216517
000216517 973__ $$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED$$aEPFL
000216517 980__ $$aARTICLE