000214509 001__ 214509
000214509 005__ 20180317093146.0
000214509 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1016/j.tree.2008.04.010
000214509 022__ $$a0169-5347
000214509 037__ $$aARTICLE
000214509 245__ $$aThe state of affairs in the kingdom of the Red Queen
000214509 260__ $$bElsevier$$c2008
000214509 269__ $$a2008
000214509 336__ $$aReviews
000214509 520__ $$aOne of the most prominent hypotheses to explain the ubiquity of sex and recombination is based on host-parasite interactions. Under the name of the Red Queen hypothesis (RQH), it has had theoretical and empirical support since its conception, but recent theoretical work has shown that the circumstances under which the RQH works remain unclear. Here we review the current status of the theory of the RQH. We argue that recent theoretical work calls for new experimental data and an increased theoretical effort to reveal the driving force of the RQH.
000214509 6531_ $$aHost-Parasite Interactions
000214509 6531_ $$aRecombination
000214509 6531_ $$aGenetic
000214509 6531_ $$aReproduction
000214509 6531_ $$aSelection
000214509 6531_ $$aGenetic
000214509 700__ $$0249283$$aSalathé, Marcel$$g263768
000214509 700__ $$aKouyos, Roger D
000214509 700__ $$aBonhoeffer, Sebastian
000214509 773__ $$j23$$k8$$q439-45$$tTrends in ecology & evolution
000214509 909CO $$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:214509$$preview$$pSV
000214509 909C0 $$0252550$$pUPSALATHE$$xU13083
000214509 917Z8 $$x182396
000214509 937__ $$aEPFL-REVIEW-214509
000214509 973__ $$aOTHER$$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED
000214509 980__ $$aREVIEW