Infoscience

Journal article

Impact of HSD11B1 polymorphisms on BMI and components of the metabolic syndrome in patients receiving psychotropic treatments

Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS) associated with psychiatric disorders and psychotropic treatments represents a major health issue. 11 beta-Hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11 beta-HSD1) is an enzyme that catalyzes tissue regeneration of active cortisol from cortisone. Elevated enzymatic activity of 11 beta-HSD1 may lead to the development of MetS. Methods We investigated the association between seven HSD11B1 gene (encoding 11 beta-HSD1) polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in a psychiatric sample treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs (n = 478). The polymorphisms that survived Bonferroni correction were analyzed in two independent psychiatric samples (n(R1) = 168, n(R2) = 188) and in several large population-based samples (n(1) = 5338; n(2) = 123 865; n(3) > 100 000). Results HSD11B1 rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers were found to be associated with lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure compared with the reference genotype (P-corrected < 0.05). These associations were exclusively detected in women (n = 257) with more than 3.1 kg/m(2), 7.5 cm, and 4.2 mmHg lower BMI, waist circumference, and diastolic blood pressure, respectively, in rs846910-A, rs375319-A, and rs4844488-G allele carriers compared with noncarriers (P-corrected < 0.05). Conversely, carriers of the rs846906-T allele had significantly higher waist circumference and triglycerides and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol exclusively in men (P-corrected = 0.028). The rs846906-T allele was also associated with a higher risk of MetS at 3 months of follow-up (odds ratio: 3.31, 95% confidence interval: 1.53-7.17, P-corrected = 0.014). No association was observed between HSD11B1 polymorphisms and BMI and MetS components in the population-based samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that HSD11B1 polymorphisms may contribute toward the development of MetS in psychiatric patients treated with potential weight gain-inducing psychotropic drugs, but do not play a significant role in the general population. Copyright (C) 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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