000198631 001__ 198631
000198631 005__ 20181203023503.0
000198631 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1073/pnas.1319388111
000198631 022__ $$a0027-8424
000198631 02470 $$2ISI$$a000332560300068
000198631 037__ $$aARTICLE
000198631 245__ $$aLinking toxicity and adaptive responses across the transcriptome, proteome, and phenotype of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii exposed to silver
000198631 260__ $$bNatl Acad Sciences$$c2014$$aWashington
000198631 269__ $$a2014
000198631 300__ $$a6
000198631 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000198631 520__ $$aUnderstanding mechanistic and cellular events underlying a toxicological outcome allows the prediction of impact of environmental stressors to organisms living in different habitats. A systems-based approach aids in characterizing molecular events, and thereby the cellular pathways that have been perturbed. However, mapping only adverse outcomes of a toxicant falls short of describing the stress or adaptive response that is mounted to maintain homeostasis on perturbations and may confer resistance to the toxic insult. Silver is a potential threat to aquatic organisms because of the increasing use of silver-based nanomaterials, which release free silver ions. The effects of silver were investigated at the transcriptome, proteome, and cellular levels of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. The cells instigate a fast transcriptome and proteome response, including perturbations in copper transport system and detoxification mechanisms. Silver causes an initial toxic insult, which leads to a plummeting of ATP and photosynthesis and damage because of oxidative stress. In response, the cells mount a defense response to combat oxidative stress and to eliminate silver via efflux transporters. From the analysis of the perturbations of the cell's functions, we derived a detailed mechanistic understanding of temporal dynamics of toxicity and adaptive response pathways for C. reinhardtii exposed to silver.
000198631 6531_ $$atoxicity response
000198631 6531_ $$aadaptive pathway
000198631 6531_ $$aalgae
000198631 6531_ $$asystems biology
000198631 6531_ $$aadverse outcome pathway
000198631 700__ $$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aPillai, Smitha
000198631 700__ $$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aBehra, Renata
000198631 700__ $$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aNestler, Holger
000198631 700__ $$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aSuter, Marc J-F
000198631 700__ $$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aSigg, Laura
000198631 700__ $$g205918$$uEawag, Swiss Fed Inst Aquat Sci & Technol, Dept Environm Toxicol, CH-8600 Dubendorf, Switzerland$$aSchirmer, Kristin$$0245915
000198631 773__ $$j111$$tProceedings Of The National Academy Of Sciences Of The United States Of America$$k9$$q3490-3495
000198631 909C0 $$xU12482$$0252401$$pTOX
000198631 909CO $$particle$$pENAC$$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:198631
000198631 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-198631
000198631 973__ $$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED$$aEPFL
000198631 980__ $$aARTICLE