000195375 001__ 195375
000195375 005__ 20181203023405.0
000195375 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1080/13546805.2013.799463
000195375 022__ $$a1354-6805
000195375 02470 $$2ISI$$a000327833100005
000195375 037__ $$aARTICLE
000195375 245__ $$aThe longitudinal association between social functioning and theory of mind in first-episode psychosis
000195375 260__ $$bTaylor & Francis$$c2014$$aHove
000195375 269__ $$a2014
000195375 300__ $$a23
000195375 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000195375 520__ $$aIntroductionThere is some cross-sectional evidence that theory of mind ability is associated with social functioning in those with psychosis but the direction of this relationship is unknown. This study investigates the longitudinal association between both theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome in first-episode psychosis.MethodsFifty-four people with first-episode psychosis were followed up at 6 and 12 months. Random effects regression models were used to estimate the stability of theory of mind over time and the association between baseline theory of mind and psychotic symptoms and social functioning outcome.ResultsNeither baseline theory of mind ability (regression coefficients: Hinting test 1.07 95% CI -0.74, 2.88; Visual Cartoon test -2.91 95% CI -7.32, 1.51) nor baseline symptoms (regression coefficients: positive symptoms -0.04 95% CI -1.24, 1.16; selected negative symptoms -0.15 95% CI -2.63, 2.32) were associated with social functioning outcome. There was evidence that theory of mind ability was stable over time, (regression coefficients: Hinting test 5.92 95% CI -6.66, 8.92; Visual Cartoon test score 0.13 95% CI -0.17, 0.44).ConclusionsNeither baseline theory of mind ability nor psychotic symptoms are associated with social functioning outcome. Further longitudinal work is needed to understand the origin of social functioning deficits in psychosis.
000195375 6531_ $$arepeated measures
000195375 6531_ $$asymptoms of psychosis
000195375 6531_ $$asocial functioning
000195375 6531_ $$atheory of mind
000195375 6531_ $$afirst-episode psychosis
000195375 700__ $$uUniv Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Ctr Mental Hlth Addict & Suicide Res, Bristol, Avon, England$$aSullivan, Sarah
000195375 700__ $$uUniv Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Ctr Mental Hlth Addict & Suicide Res, Bristol, Avon, England$$aLewis, Glyn
000195375 700__ $$uUniv Lausanne, Inst Psychol, Fac Sci Sociales & Polit, Lausanne, Switzerland$$aMohr, Christine
000195375 700__ $$0246595$$g229804$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Psychophys, Lausanne, Switzerland$$aHerzig, Daniela
000195375 700__ $$uUniv Liverpool, Inst Psychol Hlth & Soc, Liverpool L69 3BX, Merseyside, England$$aCorcoran, Rhiannon
000195375 700__ $$aDrake, Richard
000195375 700__ $$aEvans, Jonathan$$uUniv Bristol, Sch Social & Community Med, Ctr Mental Hlth Addict & Suicide Res, Bristol, Avon, England
000195375 773__ $$j19$$tCognitive Neuropsychiatry$$k1$$q58-80
000195375 909C0 $$xU10987$$0252249$$pLPSY
000195375 909CO $$pSV$$particle$$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:195375
000195375 917Z8 $$x166039
000195375 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-195375
000195375 973__ $$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED$$aEPFL
000195375 980__ $$aARTICLE