000189412 001__ 189412
000189412 005__ 20181203023254.0
000189412 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1038/nrmicro3076
000189412 022__ $$a1740-1526
000189412 02470 $$2ISI$$a000321827300015
000189412 037__ $$aARTICLE
000189412 245__ $$aA problem of persistence: still more questions than answers?
000189412 260__ $$bNature Publishing Group$$c2013$$aLondon
000189412 269__ $$a2013
000189412 300__ $$a5
000189412 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000189412 520__ $$aThe current antibiotic resistance crisis has led to increased pressure to prioritize strategies to tackle the issue, with a strong focus being placed on the development of novel antimicrobials. However, one major obstacle that is often overlooked is persister cells, which are refractory to antibiotic treatment. Tackling persistence is a challenge because these cell types are extremely difficult to study and, consequently, little is known about their physiology and the factors that lead to their emergence. Here, four experts contemplate the main physiological features that define persistence and the implications of persistence for antibiotic treatment regimens, and consider what the study of bacterial persistence has taught us about the heterogeneity of bacterial populations.
000189412 700__ $$uHebrew Univ Jerusalem, Racah Inst Phys, IL-91904 Jerusalem, Israel$$aBalaban, Nathalie Q.
000189412 700__ $$uNewcastle Univ, Sch Med, Ctr Bacterial Cell Biol, Newcastle Upon Tyne NE2 4AX, Tyne & Wear, England$$aGerdes, Kenn
000189412 700__ $$uNortheastern Univ, Dept Biol, Boston, MA 02115 USA$$aLewis, Kim
000189412 700__ $$g177246$$aMcKinney, John D.$$0243894
000189412 773__ $$j11$$tNature Reviews Microbiology$$k8$$q587-591
000189412 909C0 $$xU11741$$0252303$$pUPKIN
000189412 909CO $$pSV$$particle$$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:189412
000189412 917Z8 $$x164606
000189412 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-189412
000189412 973__ $$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED$$aEPFL
000189412 980__ $$aARTICLE