000184073 001__ 184073
000184073 005__ 20181203022951.0
000184073 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1007/s00442-012-2376-y
000184073 022__ $$a0029-8549
000184073 02470 $$2ISI$$a000310999400024
000184073 037__ $$aARTICLE
000184073 245__ $$aComplex interactions between spatial pattern of resident species and invasiveness of newly arriving species affect invasibility
000184073 260__ $$aNew York$$bSpringer$$c2012
000184073 269__ $$a2012
000184073 300__ $$a10
000184073 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000184073 520__ $$aUnderstanding the factors that affect establishment success of new species in established communities requires the study of both the ability of new species to establish and community resistance. Spatial pattern of species within a community can affect plant performance by changing the outcome of inter-specific competition, and consequently community invasibility. We studied the effects of spatial pattern of resident plant communities on fitness of genotypes from the native and introduced ranges of two worldwide invasive species, Centaurea stoebe and Senecio inaequidens, during their establishment stage. We experimentally established artificial plant mixtures with 4 or 8 resident species in intra-specifically aggregated or random spatial patterns, and added seedlings of genotypes from the native and introduced ranges of the two target species. Early growth of both S. inaequidens and C. stoebe was higher in aggregated than randomly assembled mixtures. However, a species-specific interaction between invasiveness and invasibility highlighted more complex patterns. Genotypes from native and introduced ranges of S. inaequidens showed the same responses to spatial pattern. By contrast, genotypes from the introduced range of C. stoebe did not respond to spatial pattern whereas native ones did. Based on phenotypic plasticity, we argue that the two target species adopted different strategies to deal with the spatial pattern of the resident plant community. We show that effects of spatial pattern of the resident community on the fitness of establishing species may depend on the diversity of the recipient community. Our results highlight the need to consider the interaction between invasiveness and invasibility in order to increase our understanding of invasion success.
000184073 6531_ $$aEstablishment success
000184073 6531_ $$aInvasive species
000184073 6531_ $$aGenotype
000184073 6531_ $$aPhenotypic plasticity
000184073 6531_ $$aSpatial aggregation
000184073 700__ $$aThebault, Aurelie$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Ecol Syst, Sch Architecture Civil & Environm Engn ENAC, Stn 2, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
000184073 700__ $$aStoll, Peter$$uUniv Basel, Sect Conservat Biol, Dept Environm Sci, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
000184073 700__ $$0241312$$aButtler, Alexandre$$g133834$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Lab Ecol Syst, Sch Architecture Civil & Environm Engn ENAC, Stn 2, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
000184073 773__ $$j170$$k4$$q1133-1142$$tOecologia
000184073 909C0 $$0252129$$pECOS$$xU11021
000184073 909CO $$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:184073$$particle$$pENAC
000184073 917Z8 $$x133834
000184073 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-184073
000184073 973__ $$aEPFL$$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED
000184073 980__ $$aARTICLE