000172809 001__ 172809
000172809 005__ 20180317094307.0
000172809 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.3354/ame01373
000172809 02470 $$2ISI$$a000275496100003
000172809 037__ $$aARTICLE
000172809 245__ $$aMethane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria at the chemocline of Lake Kinneret (Israel)
000172809 269__ $$a2010
000172809 260__ $$c2010
000172809 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000172809 520__ $$aThe vertical distribution of methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (MOB and AOB, respectively), and the physicochemical conditions in the chemocline of Lake Kinneret (Israel) were studied at a resolution of 10 cm from 16.2 to 17.7 m depth. Profiles of the chemical parameters indicated decreasing concentrations of methane (from 22.4 to 0.11 mu mol l(-1)) and ammonia (from 14.2 to 8.4 mu mol l(-1)) towards the water surface and in close proximity to the chemocline, The disappearance of methane coincided with methane oxidation that could be corroborated throughout this layer with highest rates at 17.4 to 17.6 m. Disappearance of ammonia could not be linked to ammonia oxidation exclusively. The genes pmoA and the homologous amoA (coding for subunit a of the methane and ammonia monooxygenase, respectively) were amplified by PCR. The products were analyzed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and sequencing of clone libraries. The results demonstrated that different MOB and AOB communities are established along the concentration gradient within the narrow layer of the metalinmetic chemocline. Changes in the intensity of the T-RFLP peaks and the frequency of different groups of alpha- and gammaproteobacterial MOB, and betaproteobacterial AOB, coincided with the concentration gradients of methane, ammonia, nitrate, and oxygen in the chemocline. This suggests that different communities of MOB, and to a lesser extent AOB, contribute to the formation of chemical gradients of their particular substrates in the chemocline.
000172809 6531_ $$aamoA
000172809 6531_ $$apmoA
000172809 6531_ $$aChemocline
000172809 6531_ $$aAmmonia
000172809 6531_ $$aMethane
000172809 6531_ $$aMethanotrophic Bacteria
000172809 6531_ $$aWater Column
000172809 6531_ $$aMonooxygenase Genes
000172809 6531_ $$aSediments
000172809 6531_ $$aConstance
000172809 6531_ $$aCommunities
000172809 6531_ $$aPopulations
000172809 6531_ $$aDiversity
000172809 6531_ $$aGermany
000172809 6531_ $$aSets
000172809 700__ $$aJunier, Pilar$$uEcole Polytech Fed Lausanne, Stn 6, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland
000172809 700__ $$aKim, Ok-Sun$$uMax Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, D-24306 Plon, Germany
000172809 700__ $$aEckert, Werner$$uKinneret Limnol Lab, IL-14950 Migdal, Israel
000172809 700__ $$aCasper, Peter$$uLeibniz Inst Freshwater Ecol & Inland Fisheries, D-16775 Stechlin, Germany
000172809 700__ $$aImhoff, Johannes F.$$uUniv Kiel, Leibniz Inst Marine Sci, D-24105 Kiel, Germany
000172809 700__ $$aWitzel, Karl-Paul$$uMax Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, D-24306 Plon, Germany
000172809 700__ $$aHadas, Ora$$uKinneret Limnol Lab, IL-14950 Migdal, Israel
000172809 773__ $$j58$$q241-248$$tAquatic Microbial Ecology
000172809 909CO $$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:172809$$pENAC$$particle
000172809 909C0 $$0252432$$pIIE$$xU10265
000172809 937__ $$aEPFL-ARTICLE-172809
000172809 973__ $$aEPFL$$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED
000172809 980__ $$aARTICLE