000139716 001__ 139716
000139716 005__ 20180428113750.0
000139716 0247_ $$2doi$$a10.1117/12.612670
000139716 020__ $$a0-8194-5856-2
000139716 022__ $$a0277-786X
000139716 037__ $$aCONF
000139716 245__ $$aDigital Holography Microscopy (DHM): Fast and robust systems for industrial  inspection with interferometer resolution
000139716 260__ $$bSPIE$$c2005
000139716 269__ $$a2005
000139716 336__ $$aConference Papers
000139716 520__ $$aWith the recent technological advances, there is an increasing need for  measurement systems providing interferometer resolution for inspection of  large quantities of individual samples in manufacturing environments.. Such  applications require high measurement rates, robustness, ease of use, and  non-contact systems. We show here that Digital Holographic Microscopy  (DIM), a new method that implements digitally the principle of holography, is  particularly well suited for such industrial applications. With the present  computers power and the developments of digital cameras, holograms can be  numerically interpreted within a tenth of second to provide simultaneously:  the phase information, which reveals object surface with vertical resolution at  the nanometer scale along the optical axis, and intensity images, as obtained  by conventional optical microscope. The strength of DHM lies in particular on  the use of the so-called off-axis configuration, which enables to capture the  whole information by a single image acquisition, i.e. typically during a few  ten of microseconds. These extremely short acquisition times make DHM  systems insensitive to vibrations. These instruments can operate without  vibration insulation means, making them a cost effective solution not only for  R&D, but also especially for an implementation on production lines.  Numerous application examples are presented in this paper such as shape  and surface characterization of high aspect ratio micro-optics, surface  nanostructures, and surface roughness.
000139716 6531_ $$a[MVD]
000139716 6531_ $$aDigital Holography Microscopy
000139716 6531_ $$ainterferometer resolution
000139716 6531_ $$areal time
000139716 6531_ $$aindustrial inspection
000139716 700__ $$aEmery, Y.
000139716 700__ $$0240772$$aCuche, E.$$g104844
000139716 700__ $$aMarquet, F.
000139716 700__ $$aAspert, N.
000139716 700__ $$aMarquet, P.
000139716 700__ $$aKühn, J.
000139716 700__ $$aBotkine, M.
000139716 700__ $$0240771$$aColomb, T.$$g100884
000139716 700__ $$0240770$$aMontfort, F.$$g102739
000139716 700__ $$0240472$$aCharrière, F.$$g119924
000139716 700__ $$0240009$$aDepeursinge, C.$$g104931
000139716 7112_ $$aEurope Optical Metrology$$cMunich$$dJune 13-17, 2005
000139716 773__ $$j5856$$q930-937$$tOptical Measurement Systems for Industrial Inspection IV
000139716 8564_ $$uhttp://spie.org/x648.html?product_id=612670$$zURL
000139716 909CO $$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:139716$$pSTI$$pconf
000139716 909C0 $$0252008$$pLOA$$xU10346
000139716 937__ $$aLOA-CONF-2005-008
000139716 973__ $$aEPFL$$sPUBLISHED
000139716 980__ $$aCONF