Infoscience

Journal article

Lifespan of Subcutaneous Glucose Sensors and their Performances During Dynamic Glycaemia Changes in Rats

Performances of a glucose sensor have been investigated during dynamic variations of plasma glucose levels. Subcutaneos glucose concentrations measured by the sensors were calculated by a one-point calibration, performed in basal conditions. A first group of sensors were chronically implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of normal rats. The animals were submitted to glucagon and insulin injection, in order to induce rapid modifications of their glycaemia. This test was repeated at different days after implantation in order to investigate the lifespan and the performance of the sensors. All the sensors were working 1 or 2 days after implantation, and 70% adequately responded to glycaemia variations at day 3 or 4. The quality of the sensors' performance remained constant as a function of the time. With a second group of sensors, we demonstrated that an efficient sterilization procedure did not alter the sensors' characteristics. At the day of implantation, the sterilized sensors' performance, during dynamic variations of plasma glucose levels, was closely similar to that of the non-sterilized sensors. The animals bearing the sterilized devices were rendered diabetic by steptozotocin (STZ) injection. Once the rats had developed a severe hyperglycaemia (1-3 days after STZ), they were injected with intravenous insulin. The subcutaneously implanted glucose sensors correctly followed the decline in plasma glucose levels. We therefore conclude that our sensor could represent a useful tool for short-term continuous blood monitoring. | Performances of a glucose sensor have been investigated during dynamic variations of plasma glucose levels. Subcutaneous glucose concentrations measured by the sensors were calculated by a one-point calibration, performed in basal conditions. A first group of sensors were chronically implanted in the subcutaneous tissue of normal rats. The animals were submitted to glucagon and insulin injection, in order to induce rapid modifications of their glycaemia. This test was repeated at different days after implantation in order to investigate the lifespan and the performance of the sensors. All the sensors were working 1 or 2 days after implantation, and 70% adequately responded to glycaemia variations at day 3 or 4. The quality of the sensor's performance remained constant as a function of the time. With a second group of sensors, we demonstrated that an efficient sterilization procedure did not alter the sensor's characteristics. At the day of implantation, the sterilized sensor's performance, during dynamic variations of plasma glucose levels, was closely similar to that of the non-sterlized sensors. The animals bearing the sterilized devices were rendered diabetic by steptozotocin (STZ) injection. Once the rats had developed a severe hyperglycaemia (1-3 days after STZ), they were injected with intravenous insulin. The subcutaneously implanted glucose sensors correctly followed the decline in plasma glucose levels. We therefore conclude that our sensor could represent a useful tool for short-term continuous blood monitoring.

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