Infoscience

Journal article

Regulation of the low density lipoprotein receptor and hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase genes by protein kinase C and a putative negative regulatory protein

Transcription of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase genes was rapidly and transiently induced (8.5- and 2.3-fold, respectively) early during phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced macrophage differentiation of the human monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. The levels of mRNA coding for LDL-R and HMG-CoA reductase increased soon after induction, reached a maximum (12- and 7-fold increase, respectively) in 2-3 hr, and then rapidly returned to the low constitutive levels observed before induction. The stability of LDL-R mRNA did not change significantly during differentiation, whereas that of HMG-CoA reductase mRNA decreased by about 5-fold 6 hr after the addition of PMA. Transcriptional induction of both LDL-R and HMG-CoA reductase genes (5.6- and 2-fold, respectively) was also observed when undifferentiated cells were treated with cycloheximide (CHX), resulting in a transient increase in steady-state mRNA (7- and 3-fold, respectively). These results suggest that expression of the two genes is maintained at low constitutive levels in uninduced THP-1 cells by a protein with a short half-life. Superinduction of both genes occurred when PMA and CHX were added simultaneously. The induction of LDL-R and HMG-CoA reductase mRNAs during early macrophage differentiation is mediated by protein kinase C. It is hypothesized that protein kinase C acts directly or indirectly to inactivate the labile negative regulatory protein. Induction of LDL-R mRNA was also observed when the human hepatocarcinoma cell line Hep G2 was treated with PMA and CHX, suggesting that this mechanism of regulation may exist in several cell types.

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