000125650 001__ 125650
000125650 005__ 20181203021249.0
000125650 037__ $$aARTICLE
000125650 245__ $$aFermentation by gut microbiota cultured in a simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem is improved by supplementing a soygerm powder
000125650 269__ $$a2000
000125650 260__ $$c2000
000125650 336__ $$aJournal Articles
000125650 520__ $$aAn in vitro model, designated the Simulator of the Human Intestinal Microbial Ecosystem (SHIME), was used to study the effect of a soygerm powder rich in beta-glycosidic phytoestrogenic isoflavones on the fermentation pattern of the colon microbiota and to determine to what extent the latter metabolize the conjugated phytoestrogens. Initially, an inoculum prepared from human feces was introduced into the reactor vessels and stabilized over 3 wk using a culture medium. This stabilization period was followed by a 2-wk control period during which the microbiota were monitored. The microbiota were then subjected to a 2-wk treatment period by adding 2.5 g/d soygerm powder to the culture medium. The addition resulted into an overall increase of bacterial marker populations (Enterobacteriaceae:, coliforms, Lactobacillus: sp., Staphylococcus: sp. and Clostridium: sp.), with a significant increase of the Lactobacillus: sp. population. The short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) concentration increased approximately 30% during the supplementation period; this was due mainly to a significant increase of acetic and propionic acids. Gas analysis revealed that the methane concentration increased significantly. Ammonium and sulfide concentrations were not influenced by soygerm supplementation. Use of an electronic nose apparatus indicated that odor concentrations decreased significantly during the treatment period. The beta-glycosidic bonds of the phytoestrogenic isoflavones were cleaved under the conditions prevailing in the large intestine. The increased bacterial fermentation after addition of the soygerm powder was paralleled by substantial metabolism of the free isoflavones (genistein, daidzein and glycitein), resulting in recovery of only 12-17% of the supplemented isoflavones.
000125650 6531_ $$aBioreactors
000125650 6531_ $$aClostridium/growth & development/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aColon/microbiology
000125650 6531_ $$aEcosystem
000125650 6531_ $$aElectric Impedance
000125650 6531_ $$aEnterobacteriaceae/growth & development/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aEscherichia coli/growth & development/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aEstrogens
000125650 6531_ $$aNon-Steroidal/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aFeces/microbiology
000125650 6531_ $$aFermentation
000125650 6531_ $$aHumans
000125650 6531_ $$aIntestines/microbiology
000125650 6531_ $$aIsoflavones/analysis/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aLactobacillus/growth & development/metabolism
000125650 6531_ $$aModels
000125650 6531_ $$aBiological
000125650 6531_ $$aPhytoestrogens
000125650 6531_ $$aPlant Preparations
000125650 6531_ $$aSoybeans
000125650 6531_ $$aStaphylococcus/growth & development/metabolism
000125650 700__ $$aDe Boever, P.
000125650 700__ $$0244717$$g182376$$aDeplancke, B.
000125650 700__ $$aVerstraete, W.
000125650 773__ $$j130$$tJ Nutr$$k10$$q2599-606
000125650 909C0 $$xU11829$$0252247$$pUPDEPLA
000125650 909CO $$pSV$$particle$$ooai:infoscience.tind.io:125650
000125650 937__ $$aUPDEPLA-ARTICLE-2000-002
000125650 973__ $$rREVIEWED$$sPUBLISHED$$aOTHER
000125650 980__ $$aARTICLE